The Importance of Mobile VR

The Importance of Mobile VR

Let me start by saying that at first, I’m not really sold by idea of having a VR experience accessed through the small screen of a smartphone. I did try Google Cardboard, it was good, better than I expected but left much to be desired, especially considering that I felt pretty nauseous after trying one of the demo game. However, after more experience in tinkering with VR content and many events happening in the real world, I realize that mobile VR is very vital for the future of this technology. It has a significant role in spreading the experience to common everyday people. For starter, the price point for this is very low. Google Cardboard can be purchased for about $25. A much better HMD like Zeiss VR One costs around $99. That’s way cheaper than Oculus Rift that costs around $399. Sure, you’ll need smartphone, but chances are, you’ve already owned one. While, for a proper experience, Oculus Rift requires a high-end gaming PC that costs around $1500. Arguing about price doesn’t really makes sense here. How about the contents then? Well, I assume that many will be developed using Google Cardboard SDK, which is actively promoted and developed by Google. It’s a good tool to make VR content, and therefore, in terms of making games, I think mobile VR is in a good company. In fact, quick search of Cardboard in Play Store yields so many results, from movie, to tech demos to games. And if installing apps proved to be much hassles, well, Google has another trick up its sleeve: YouTube. Recent update in YouTube, allows viewer...
It’s A Good Time to Develop VR Contents

It’s A Good Time to Develop VR Contents

Ever since the head of my department bought two Oculus Rift HMDs and lent one of them to me, I started to dabble a lot into this field. Some months before it, I managed to get a Google Cardboard, which was a good introduction to VR, but I didn’t really able to develop further interest, partially because I had quite a massive simulation sickness for playing with it in a short time (though, this is probably mistake in my side, since I have an acute vertigo to begin with). Now, Oculus Rift DK2 is actually a very good piece of hardware. I can use it comfortably for 20 minutes using my 2012 non-retina MBP. It also comes with a rapidly developed software suites for developers, meaning it’s actually pretty fast and easy if you want to start making contents for it. The ecosystem is lively, plus there’s a lot of options to pick from should you want to start your adventure here. Indeed, generally speaking, it’s a good time to develop for VR. As I looked around for games and apps demos for the Rift, I founded out that there’s not much released by big studios/companies, but there are plenty to download or buy from small indie developers. This is another proof that developers who bought it, aren’t afraid of showing whatever they had, even if it’s just a single level wandering around demo type of thing. And this is very important. This new wave of VR devices still has plenty to crack to make it ready for public use. Several issues, including the haunting simulation sickness are still...